Cystic Fibrosis

What Is It?

Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease. It causes cells to produce mucus that is sticky and thicker than normal. This mucus builds up, particularly in the lungs and organs of the digestive tract.

Cystic fibrosis affects many parts of the body, including the lungs, liver, pancreas, urinary tract, reproductive organs and sweat glands. Certain cells in these organs normally make mucus and other watery secretions. But in cystic fibrosis, these cells produce secretions that are thicker than normal. This leads to other problems.

In the lungs, thick secretions trap germs. This leads to repeated lung infections.

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