The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide Emergencies and First Aid
Harvard Health Publications
Order the Book
Contact Us

Sign up for our free e-mail newsletter, HEALTHbeat.  
Email Address:
 
First Name (optional):
 
 
Special Health Information Reports
Incontinence
Weight Loss
Prostate Disease
Vitamins and Minerals
Aching Hands
See All Titles
Browse Health Information
Common Medical Conditions
Wellness & Prevention
Emotional Well Being & Mental Health
Women’s Health
Men’s Health
Heart & Circulatory Health
About the Book
New Information
About the Team
Order the Book
Return to the Family Health Guide Home Page
  Harvard Health Publications
contact us

Unless the person is able to tell you to the contrary, assume that anyone with a back injury also has a neck injury.

Place a board, such as a door or table leaf, next to the person. The board should extend below the buttocks (ideally to the feet) and above the head. Keeping the head aligned with the rest of the body, gently logroll the person toward you. Move the board under the person and ease him or her onto it. If the person is vomiting, lay him or her on one side and continue to support the head.

To immobilize the person, tie the person to the board with a rope, shirt, belt, or strips of cloth at the ankles, legs, chest, and across the forehead.

Tie tightly enough so the person cannot move, but not so tightly that you cut off circulation or inhibit breathing. Place towels, sweaters, or pillows snugly around the person, especially alongside the head and neck. Once immobilized, the person can be carefully moved to safety.




©2000–2006 President & Fellows of Harvard College

Sign Up Now For
HEALTHbeat
Our FREE E-mail Newsletter

In each weekly issue of HEALTHbeat:

  • Get trusted advice from the doctors at Harvard Medical School
  • Learn tips for living a healthy lifestyle
  • Stay up-to-date on the latest developments in health
  • Plus, receive your FREE Bonus Report, Living to 100: What's the secret?

[ Maybe Later ] [ No Thanks ]