2006 Update on Childhood and Adolescent Immunizations

2006 Update on Childhood and Adolescent Immunizations

The U.S. government and major physician organizations have released their annual schedule of recommended childhood and adolescent immunizations for 2006..Infectious diseases are especially dangerous for the young, as the immune systems of infants and children aren't sufficiently developed to beat back infectious diseases on their own. Early vaccination protects children when they are especially vulnerable to potentially lethal diseases. And early vaccination has done more than anything else to lower the rate of childhood deaths worldwide. The following table summarizes the latest recommendations.

Birth

1 month

2 months

4 months

6 months

12 months

15 months

18 months

24 months

4 to 6 years

11 to 12 years

13 to 18 years

Hepatitis B*

1st

X**

2nd

X

X

X

3rd

X

X

X

X

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

1st

X

2nd

X

3rd

X

4th

X***

X

X

5th

X

6th

X

Haemophilus influenzae Type b

1st

X

2nd

X

3rd

X

4th

X

X

Inactivated Poliovirus

1st

X

2nd

X

3rd

X

X

X

X

4th

Measles, Mumps, Rubella

1st

X

X

2nd

X

X

X

Varicella

X

X

X

Pneumococcal

1st

X

2nd

X

3rd

X

4th

X

X

Influenza (yearly)

X

X****

X****

X****

Meningococcal Polysaccharide

X*****

X*****

Meningococcal conjugate

X

X

Heapatitis A

1st

X

X

X

2nd

X******

X******

* Administering 4 doses of HepB vaccine is permissible, but if monovalent HepB is used, a dose at 4 months is not necessary.

** Vaccination with HepB vaccine at birth can be delayed in rare circumstances for infants of HBsAg-negative mothers, only if a physician's order to withhold the vaccine and a copy of the mother's original laboratory report of the negative status are documented in the infant's medical record.

***The 4th dose of DTaP can be administered at 12 months if child is not returning at 15-18 months of age, and if 6 months have elapsed since 3rd dose.

**** Risk factors mandating influenza vaccination in children older than 6 months now specifically include conditions that can compromise respiratory function or handling of respiratory secretions or that can increase the risk for aspiration.

***** For prevention of invasive meningococcal disease, vaccination with meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in children aged 2 to 10 years and with MCV4 for older children and adolescents in certain high-risk groups is recommended.

****** 2nd dose of Hepatitis A vaccine should be administered at least 6 months after the first dose

March 2006 update

1 month

X