Friedreich's Ataxia

Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited (genetic) disorder that causes certain nerve cells to deteriorate over time. In many cases, this disorder also affects the heart, certain bones and cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. The illness typically begins with difficulty walking. People with Friedreich's ataxia develop clumsy, shaky movements of the legs (called gait ataxia) during childhood or early adolescence. In rare cases, symptoms appear in infants and in middle-aged adults. As the disease gets worse, people may develop bony deformities of the spine and feet, loss of sensation in the limbs, speech problems, abnormal eye movements, heart disease and diabetes.
To continue reading this article, you must login.
  • Research health conditions
  • Check your symptoms
  • Prepare for a doctor's visit or test
  • Find the best treatments and procedures for you
  • Explore options for better nutrition and exercise
Learn more about the many benefits and features of joining Harvard Health Online »