Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic fatigue syndrome is a complicated illness characterized by at least six months of extreme fatigue that is not relieved by rest, and a group of additional symptoms that also are constant for at least six months. In many people with chronic fatigue syndrome, the disorder begins suddenly, often following a flulike infection or an episode of physical or psychological trauma, such as surgery, a traumatic accident or the death of a loved one. In other cases, chronic fatigue syndrome develops gradually. The illness lasts for many months or years, and only a small percentage of people recover full health. Many people feel tired a lot of the time, and many seek help from their doctors. Most people who experience chronic (long-lasting) fatigue are not suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. Depression and overwork are much more common causes of chronic fatigue.
To continue reading this article, you must login.
  • Research health conditions
  • Check your symptoms
  • Prepare for a doctor's visit or test
  • Find the best treatments and procedures for you
  • Explore options for better nutrition and exercise
Learn more about the many benefits and features of joining Harvard Health Online »