Harvard Health Letter

Four sob stories

Research on crying focuses on several different areas, including the chemicals in emotional tears and their purpose, and whether or not depressed people cry more. Tears provoked by emotion contain higher levels of proteins and the mineral manganese. In 2011, Israeli researchers reported results in the journal Science that suggested tears are capable of sending chemical signals. They conducted an experiment that involved having men sniff women's tears and a saline solution. Tests showed that the men reacted differently to a whiff of the real tears. Their testosterone levels dipped, and brain scans showed less activity in areas associated with sexual arousal. The researchers' theory: women's tears may counteract men's aggressive tendencies. Others have speculated on the role of tears in evolution and natural selection. Depression makes people sad, so it's presumed that depressed people cry more than those who aren't depressed. There's also an abiding belief that more severe bouts with depression can have just the opposite effect and rob people of their capacity to cry. Researchers found that an inability to cry was associated with severe depression.
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