Harvard Health Letter

Cognitive behavioral therapy helps depression

Cognitive behavioral therapy is effective at treating depression. It’s based on the idea that our thoughts make us suffer as much as external things do. Changing unhealthy thinking can bring relief in a way that medication can’t, because there may still be behavioral patterns that undermine a sense of well-being. A CBT therapist helps a person identify automatic negative thoughts and understand why the thoughts aren’t rational, then help come up with ways to rebut the destructive thoughts and develop techniques to reinforce positive ones. CBT is also helpful for treatment-resistant depression.
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