Unexplained Weight Gain in Children and Teens

Weight gain in children, as in adults, is usually due to eating more or exercising less.

It can be caused by an illness or medication, though this is not common.

If your child has gained weight and you don't know why, you should call your doctor. This decision guide doesn't take the place of and shouldn't delay that call, but it will give you an idea of the questions your doctor may ask and the tests that he or she may order.

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Along with the weight gain, have you noticed that your child is having swelling, which might be most noticeable in the hands, feet, or face?

Yes, my child is having swelling.

No, my child is not having any swelling.

Good. Swelling can be a sign of edema, a condition in which there is excess fluid collection in the body. This can be caused by heart, kidney, or liver problems and needs immediate medical attention.

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