Acid Reflux Treatment

Welcome to the Acid Reflux Treatment Guide!

This interactive advice program was developed by faculty of Harvard Medical School. If you have frequent heartburn or other typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), this guide can provide you with an appropriate treatment approach in only a few minutes.

If the diagnosis is clear, most treatments for GERD can be initiated without the help of a doctor. However, this guide is intended to be used as a complement to discussions with your doctor, not as a substitute for office-based care.

You will encounter a small number of questions about your experience with GERD as you proceed through this program. Your answers to these questions will help us to personalize our recommendations for you.

Click here to begin: symptoms of GERD

Symptoms of GERD

Some people who have symptoms from heart disease mistakenly think they are experiencing episodes of acid indigestion. Before you proceed through our advice guide, we would like to make sure that your symptoms are not likely to result from coronary artery disease. Review the following facts that can make it easy for a person to wrongly blame heart symptoms on acid reflux.

  • Symptoms of chest pressure or heaviness, chest pain, and nausea can be signs of heart disease.

  • In some individuals, symptoms of "angina" follow meals.

If you are over the age of 45 or you have symptoms or risks that make heart disease a possibility, take the time today to arrange an evaluation with your doctor.

What would you like to do next?

Review my risks for coronary artery disease.

Review typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux.

Proceed with the treatment portion of the guide.

Are you at risk for coronary artery disease?

A variety of habits and health conditions increase the likelihood that you have (or will eventually develop) coronary artery disease. These risk factors include

  • a high blood cholesterol level

  • a high level of LDL cholesterol, commonly called "bad cholesterol"

  • a low level of HDL cholesterol, commonly called "good cholesterol"

  • high blood pressure (hypertension)

  • diabetes

  • family history of coronary artery disease at a fairly young age

  • cigarette smoking

  • obesity

  • physical inactivity (too little regular exercise).

What would you like to do next?

Review typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux.

Proceed with the treatment portion of the guide.

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