Harvard Health Blog

Join the discussion with experts from Harvard Health Publications and others like you on a variety of health topics, medical news and views.

Many babies and toddlers use mobile devices every day

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

You’ve probably seen parents handing a smartphone or tablet to their young children to entertain them when they need to be quiet or patient. A recent study confirms what you’ve probably suspected: that most children use mobile devices every day. But widespread use of these devices cuts into time that kids could spend interacting with adults, which is crucial for brain development. The next time you’re tempted to hand over the smartphone, try a quick game instead.

Compassionate veteran care: Embracing respect for the individual

Sigmund Hough, PhD, ABPP/rp
Sigmund Hough, PhD, ABPP/rp, Contributing Editor

The need to support injured soldiers dates back to our country’s earliest days. That mission remains essential today. Those who may be eligible for VA benefits and services — veterans and their family or survivors — make up a quarter of the United States’ population. Individuals seeking care through the Department of Veterans Affairs deserve a thoughtful and compassionate evaluation to not only compensate them for their service, but connect them with the care they need.

Miscarriage: Keep breaking the silence

Hope Ricciotti, MD
Hope Ricciotti, MD, Editor in Chief, Harvard Women's Health Watch

Many public figures have begun speaking up about their experiences with miscarriage. While it’s wonderful that they’re breaking the silence, a recent survey has revealed that the general public still has a lot of misconceptions about this surprisingly common event. Dr. Hope Ricciotti shares her reactions to the survey results, and her advice to women experiencing miscarriage.

Update on the SPRINT trial: Preliminary results pan out

Deepak Bhatt, MD, MPH

Formally published results of the SPRINT trial confirm the early conclusions released in September. A target systolic blood pressure (the top number) of 120 mm Hg or less offers real health benefits, including a lower risk for cardiovascular problems and even death. Even if you don’t have high blood pressure, the results are so compelling that everyone should know his or her blood pressure and develop a plan with a primary care physician to achieve and maintain the “ideal” blood pressure for them.

Active surveillance is safe for low-risk prostate cancers

Charlie Schmidt
Charlie Schmidt, Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Disease

A new study confirms that active surveillance is a safe and reasonable alternative to immediate treatment for prostate cancer. In recently published study that followed 1,300 men, the prostate cancer survival rate after 10-15 years of active surveillance, was 99%. For some men, a strong discomfort with “living with cancer” may steer them away from postponing treatment in favor of careful monitoring.

Healing through music

Beverly Merz
Beverly Merz, Executive Editor, Harvard Women's Health Watch

Music therapists are trained and certified to help patients in many ways. Research suggests that music therapy is more than just a nice perk. It can offer real benefits in reducing pain, anxiety, and improving quality of life for people with dementia.

Online cognitive behavioral therapy: The latest trend in mental health care

James Cartreine, PhD
James Cartreine, PhD, Contributing Editor

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a very effective treatment for a number of mental health issues, including depression and anxiety. But not everyone is comfortable working with a therapist face-to-face, and for some people, it can be hard to afford — or even find — this treatment. Research suggests that online programs may be able to deliver CBT to a wider audience efficiently and successfully.

Complementary therapies for neck pain

Robert Shmerling, M.D.
Robert Shmerling, M.D., Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Neck pain is a common, and often frustrating, condition. Although there are many causes of neck pain, in many cases, it can be hard to know the exact reason for the pain. There is no one treatment that is reliably helpful, and treatments can take a long time to work. But a new study suggests that two complementary therapies — acupuncture and the Alexander Technique — may offer a way for neck pain sufferers to find genuine and lasting relief.

The placebo effect: Amazing and real

Robert Shmerling, M.D.
Robert Shmerling, M.D., Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Many people believe that the placebo effect is solely a psychological phenomenon. But for some people, a placebo can have real, measurable therapeutic benefits. The power of the placebo effect is significant enough that it can actually skew study results. Additional research is needed to better understand how to leverage the placebo effect and when doing so might offer real benefits to patients.

Challenge your mind and body to sharpen your thinking skills

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Mental and social engagement can help keep your brain sharp and lower the chances of cognitive decline, in part because challenging our brains may help forge new connections between brain cells. The key to taking advantage of the brain’s malleability is to find activities that you truly enjoy and to commit to life-long learning.