Drugs and Supplements

Think your child has a penicillin allergy? Maybe not.

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Because diagnosis of drug allergies is often done based on symptoms but without testing, many people who believe they are allergic to antibiotics such as penicillin do not in fact have the allergy.

4 ways to avoid mistakes with liquid medicines

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Giving the proper dosage of a liquid medication can be confusing, and parents can accidentally give an incorrect dose if they are tired or distracted. These tips will help you give the right dose every time.

A spoonful of motivation helps the medicine go down

David R. Topor, PhD, MS-HPEd

Sticking to a medication regimen is challenging, and one of the biggest hurdles is staying motivated. Linking proper use of a drug to one’s broader life goals can help make it easier to take regularly.

7 ways to save cash on prescription drugs

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Medication costs vary widely depending on the type of drug, insurance coverage, and other factors. There are several ways to save money on medications, including choosing a generic version or comparing prices from several stores.

Over-the-counter pain relievers and your heart

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

As the evidence mounts linking use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with increased risk of heart failure or cardiac arrest, consumers need to be aware of the risks involved in taking these medications.

Taking medicines like you’re supposed to: Why is it so hard?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

Remembering to take medication regularly and consistently is a challenge. While various devices and strategies have been studied, sometimes the best approach is simply linking to another task that needs to be remembered.

Opioid addiction: Long-term treatment for a chronic condition

Glen Buchberger, MD
Glen Buchberger, MD, Contributor

Studies suggest that extended medication-assisted treatment is more effective in treating opioid addiction than short term use. This strategy may prove an important part of addressing the opioid crisis.

Disposing of your expired or unused medications gets a whole lot easier (and safer) this weekend

Celia Smoak Spell
Celia Smoak Spell, Assistant Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Leftover or expired medications can be harmful or dangerous, so disposing of them properly is important. National Drug Take Back Day this Saturday provides a safe and convenient way to do so.

Cracking the coconut oil craze

Julie Corliss
Julie Corliss, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

The health benefits of coconut oil remain unproven and there is no evidence that consuming it lowers the risk for heart disease. Results of studies of populations in parts of India, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, and Polynesia who consume large amounts of coconut must be tempered with the fact that these traditional diets include more healthful fish, fruits, and vegetables than the typical American diet. That said, it’s fine to enjoy foods prepared with coconut oil provided they are occasional treats.

Treating pain after opioid addiction: A personal story

Peter Grinspoon, MD
Peter Grinspoon, MD, Contributing Editor

What happens when a person who was addicted to opiates is injured and needs pain medication? A doctor who is in recovery has firsthand experience.