Archive for November, 2012

Holly Strawbridge

Unlike death and taxes, cardiovascular disease may be avoided

If you take good care of yourself, you just might end up avoiding cardiovascular disease (CVD), the most common killer in this country. That’s the bottom line from a study published this week in JAMA. Researchers from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine analyzed five long-term studies which documented cardiovascular risk factors for 120,000 individuals at ages 45, 55, 65, and 75. This time they cast a broader net and tallied up all cardiovascular events—nonfatal and fatal heart attack and stroke, angina, the need for angioplasty or bypass surgery, heart failure, and death due to cardiovascular disease. The percentages of people who experienced one of these “events” was huge, above 50% at all four ages. However, those with an optimal risk factor profile—non-smoker, no diabetes, blood pressure less than 120/80 mm Hg, and total cholesterol less than 180 mg/dL—had a much lower lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. For example, men and women with optimal profiles at age 55 were 30% to almost 50% less likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those with two or more major risk factors. They also lived an average of 14 years longer free of cardiovascular disease.

Daniel Pendick

Mental strain helps maintain a healthy brain

When it comes to keeping healthy and fit, living a mentally active life is as important as regular physical exercise. Just as your muscles grow stronger with use, mental exercise keeps your mental skills and memory in tone. Although any brain exercise is better than being a total mental couch potato, some kinds of “brain work” are more effective than others. The activities with the most impact are those that require you to work beyond what is easy and comfortable. Try these four basic brain-health strategies: Be a lifelong learner. Strain your brain with mentally challenging tasks. Get out of your comfort zone from time to time to challenge your mental skills. Be social. And don’t forget your body—physical activity that gets your pulse thumping helps the mind as well as the heart.

Patrick J. Skerrett

New treatment for head lice effective with one dose and no combing

As a parent who has dutifully combed nits from my children’s hair, the promise of a no-comb treatment for head lice sounds mighty appealing. An article in today’s New England Journal of Medicine looks like a slam dunk for such a treatment, a medication called ivermectin (Sklice). In two trials, one dose of ivermectin and no nit-combing did vastly better than a placebo treatment. Side effects were also minimal. Keep in mind that the trials didn’t test ivermectin against the current standard treatment using lotions made with permethrin or pyrethrins. And they included under 800 people in carefully controlled situations. That means we don’t really know the true effectiveness, side effects, safety profile, and interactions with other drugs. Until more is known about side effects and how ivermectin stacks up against other treatments, it seems wise to follow the current guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. They call for the use of an over-the-counter product containing permethrin or pyrethrins as a first salvo against head lice, along with combing wet hair with a fine-toothed comb to remove nits.