Harvard Health Letter

Do antidepressants work in the damaged brain?

In contrast to the disappointing results for Alzheimer's disease, antidepressants are showing real promise as medications that might help people recover from strokes — and their positive effects may go beyond depression. Successful treatment of depression may have "downstream" benefits that go beyond mental health. Antidepressants may also positively affect areas and networks in the brain that improve other impaired functions, not just mental outlook and depression. In 2011, French investigators reported that fluoxetine and physical therapy improved people's recovery from stroke-induced paralysis and muscle weakness. And at about the same time, a team of researchers from Japan and the University of Iowa published findings that showed fluoxetine or nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor, other brands), one of the tricyclic antidepressants, helped with overall disability.
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