Latest from Harvard Health

Coming to terms with constipation

Constipation is rarely the symptom of a serious illness but can be triggered by medications or disruptions to one’s daily routine. Increased dietary fiber, regular exercise, and osmotic laxatives that bulk up stools can help alleviate constipation. (Locked) More »

Constipation: A connection to heart disease?

Chronic constipation has been linked to a slightly higher risk of dying of cardiovascular disease. One possible explanation: infrequent bowel movements lead to straining, which can raise blood pressure, stressing the heart and blood vessels. Many medications (especially painkillers) can… (Locked) More »

Should you keep taking that heartburn medication?

Everyone gets a little heartburn now and then. But if it happens more than three times a week, it’s time to do something about it. One way to treat heartburn is with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), which help reduce stomach acid.… (Locked) More »

Harvard Health Blog

Read More Posts »

Meet the Harvard Health Experts

JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH Featured Expert:

JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH

Dr. JoAnn E. Manson is chief of the Division of Preventive Medicine and co-director of the Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Michael and Lee Bell Professor of Women's Health at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Manson's research has focused on several important areas: women's health, randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular disease prevention, biomarker studies, and translational research. She is the principal investigator on several grants from the National Institutes of Health, including the Vitamin D and Omega-3 Trial (VITAL), the Women's Health Initiative Vanguard Clinical Center at Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Trial, and the Biochemical and Genetic Risk Factors for CVD in Women, among others. She is also leading the largest research trial to date to investigate the heart health benefits of cocoa flavanols by administering the concentrated nutrients in capsule form.

Dr. Manson has received numerous awards and honors, including the Woman in Science Award from the American Medical Women's Association, the Population Research Prize and the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association, and has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. She was also one of the physicians featured in the National Library of Medicine's exhibition, "History of American Women Physicians" in Bethesda, Maryland. She is a Past President of the North American Menopause Society.

Walter C. Willett, DrPh, M.D.

Walter C. Willett, DrPh, M.D.

Dr. Walter Willett is Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition and Chairman of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Willett, an American, was born in Hart, Michigan and grew up in Madison, Wisconsin, studied food science at Michigan State University, and graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School before obtaining a Doctorate in Public Health from Harvard School of Public Health.  Dr. Willett has focused much of his work over the last 25 years on the development of methods, using both questionnaire and biochemical approaches, to study the effects of diet on the occurrence of major diseases. He has applied these methods starting in 1980 in the Nurses' Health Studies I and II and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Together, these cohorts that include nearly 300,000 men and women with repeated dietary assessments are providing the most detailed information on the long-term health consequences of food choices.

Dr. Willett has published over 1,500 articles, primarily on lifestyle risk factors for heart disease and cancer, and has written the textbook, Nutritional Epidemiology, published by Oxford University Press. He also has four books for the general public, Eat, Drink and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Healthy Eating, which has appeared on most major bestseller lists, Eat, Drink, and Weigh Less, co-authored with Mollie Katzen, The Fertility Diet, co-authored with Jorge Chavarro and Pat Skerrett, and most recently Thinfluence, co-authored with Malissa Wood, M.D. Dr. Willett is the most cited nutritionist internationally, and is among the five most cited persons in all fields of clinical science. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and the recipient of many national and international awards for his research.

William C. DeWolf, MD

William C. DeWolf, MD

Dr. William C. DeWolf is Urologist-in-Chief and Director of the Urologic Research Laboratories at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School.

His major areas of interest include urologic malignancies and prostatic diseases. His major research interest is molecular genetics and the biochemistry of malignancy.

Dr. DeWolf earned his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School and has completed advanced training in urologic surgery, general surgery, and transplantation. He has received several major awards, including a National Institutes of Health Research Career Development Award, and has been an American Urological Association Scholar. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.

Dr. DeWolf has served as president of the National Urologic Forum, serves on the editorial board of the journal Urology, and is a referee for several major urologic and scientific journals. He has authored or co-authored over 200 articles and chapters.

Eric Rimm, ScD

Eric Rimm, ScD

Dr. Eric Rimm is a Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition and Director of the Program in Cardiovascular Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health and also Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. His research group focuses on the study of diet and lifestyle characteristics in relation to cardiovascular disease. He also studies the impact of school nutrition policies on the diets of school children, and the impact of food stamps on dietary habits.

Dr. Rimm was a member of the scientific advisory committee for the 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. He is an associate editor for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the American Journal of Epidemiology. He was awarded the 2012 American Society for Nutrition's General Mills Institute of Health and Nutrition Innovation Award.

Dr. Rimm earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, his doctor of science degree from the Harvard School of Public Health, and completed a nutrition and epidemiology fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health. During his 20-plus years on the faculty at Harvard, he has published more than 450 peer reviewed publications.

Suzanne Olbricht, MD

Suzanne Olbricht, MD

Dr. Suzanne Olbricht is a dermatologist at the Lahey Hospital and Medical Center in Burlington, Massachusetts, and Associate Professor of Dermatology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Olbricht graduated from Indiana University in 1973, earned her medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine in Texas and completed her internship in internal medicine at Boston City Hospital in 1977. She received her residency training in dermatology at Boston City Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. She did a fellowship in Mohs' micrographic surgery and cutaneous oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Olbricht's special interest is Mohs' micrographic surgery for the removal of difficult skin cancers.